Thread: rear end camber

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    rear end camber
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    Why is 2 degrees camber the ideal setting in an A arm ? *and what is the issue if there is more then that in a rearend setup??
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    Re: rear end camber
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    Quote Originally Posted by jerry\";p=\"66184
    Why is 2 degrees camber the ideal setting in an A arm ? *and what is the issue if there is more then that in a rearend setup??
    Any camber in the rear on an a-arm setup will cost you travel, the more camber you have, the more travel you loose because the outboard cv or u-joint hit's max angle quicker. *Not saying not to run any, just telling you what the drawback is.....
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    Re: rear end camber
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    [quote=yoshi\";p=\"66189]
    Quote Originally Posted by "jerry\";p=\"66184":11f8590h
    Why is 2 degrees camber the ideal setting in an A arm ? *and what is the issue if there is more then that in a rearend setup??
    Any camber in the rear on an a-arm setup will cost you travel, the more camber you have, the more travel you loose because the outboard cv or u-joint hit's max angle quicker. *Not saying not to run any, just telling you what the drawback is.....[/quote:11f8590h]

    Although if you changed your trailing arms to semi trailing and gave your rear wheels a couple degrees of negative camber at full droop, it would reduce the CV angle there. That would allow for a bit more travel. Also, the wheel position would be lower relative to the CV at that point and higher relative to the CV at full bump and positive camber. In short, you could get more travel by introducing camber gain. It would also reduce your axle plunge.

    Quote Originally Posted by jerry\";p=\"66184
    Why is 2 degrees camber the ideal setting in an A arm ? *and what is the issue if there is more then that in a rearend setup??
    I have noticed if I put in too much camber in the rear, the tires slide way too easy and it is hard to keep the machine from spinning out. Most of the time I don't measure what I have, I just adjust until it feels right.
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    Re: rear end camber
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    Quote Originally Posted by LiveWire\";p=\"66191
    Although if you changed your trailing arms to semi trailing and gave your rear wheels a couple degrees of negative camber at full droop, it would reduce the CV angle there. That would allow for a bit more travel. Also, the wheel position would be lower relative to the CV at that point and higher relative to the CV at full bump and positive camber. In short, you could get more travel by introducing camber gain. It would also reduce your axle plunge.
    I actually meant to say any camber at full droop will limit travel, and was referring to camber tilting the top in...

    Also, you can't gain any travel by having more camber at the wheel, your still limited by the inner cv/u-joint (which stays straight up) which will max out before you could see any gain from having less angle on the wheel cv/u-joint side.....
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    Re: rear end camber
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    Isn't camber needed to keep the treaded part of the tire or most of it on the *ground when cornering? To much camber will wear away on the inner side wall and visa vera? From my point of view, most of the buggies have to much camber? Am I wrong in my thinking? I'm talking about the rear.
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    Re: rear end camber
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    Quote Originally Posted by nutnbolt2002\";p=\"66198
    Isn't camber needed to keep the treaded part of the tire or most of it on the *ground when cornering? To much camber will wear away on the inner side wall and visa vera? From my point of view, most of the buggies have to much camber? Am I wrong in my thinking? I'm talking about the rear.
    I run zero camber in the rear of my setup, but run camber in the front at both ride height and more as the front end compresses. *I agree you need it for turning, but since I have never had any problems, sand, dirt, street, or otherwise, with the back end of my rail acting loose or fishtailing, I see no reason to incorporate it into my design and cost myself travel. *In sand use, your not gonna have a huge problem with tire wear on the sides of the tire, the paddles will wear out long before the sidewall is damaged to the point of not being usable....
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    Re: rear end camber
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    I would say you are right, sand is less critical for rear camber. For hard pack wouldn't side wall flex in the tire you use be the major factor in setting the rear camber?
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    Re: rear end camber
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    [quote=yoshi\";p=\"66196]
    Quote Originally Posted by "LiveWire\";p=\"66191":d0oqr1lo
    Although if you changed your trailing arms to semi trailing and gave your rear wheels a couple degrees of negative camber at full droop, it would reduce the CV angle there. That would allow for a bit more travel. Also, the wheel position would be lower relative to the CV at that point and higher relative to the CV at full bump and positive camber. In short, you could get more travel by introducing camber gain. It would also reduce your axle plunge.
    I actually meant to say any camber at full droop will limit travel, and was referring to camber tilting the top in...

    Also, you can't gain any travel by having more camber at the wheel, your still limited by the inner cv/u-joint (which stays straight up) which will max out before you could see any gain from having less angle on the wheel cv/u-joint side.....[/quote0oqr1lo]

    Yes you can gain travel because with the axle in the same position, same angle, the wheel will be lower relative to the CV with negative camber at full droop. It will be higher relative to the outer CV at full bump. Usually you can't use the entire angle upward anyway though. Even if you had 0 camber at full droop, you would at the least lose no travel having camber gain.
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    Re: rear end camber
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    Yoshi, what are you loosing in travel with 2 to 3 deg. of camber gain?
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    Re: rear end camber
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    Quote Originally Posted by nutnbolt2002\";p=\"66214
    Yoshi, what are you loosing in travel with 2 to 3 deg. of camber gain?
    Depends on how long your axles are, but ask Gene, he knows how much he lost with a few degrees camber, that's why he's redesigning the rear end to get rid of it all together at full droop.....
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