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    800cc Buggy shocks
    #1
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    What shocks work well on an 800cc buggy? Bilstien-Fox /Where to get them.
    06 800cc Roketa, Turbo'd + many mods
    09 RZR 170 yut many mods
    09 WR 250f
    09 KLX 140L Monster Energy
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    Re: 800cc Buggy shocks
    #2
    Admin Gene's Avatar
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    Dec 2005
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    Both brands should offer something that works on your car and dealers are plenty, try E-bay.

    Selecting the right shock begins with knowing how much stroke your current shocks has. Measure the shocks' chrome shaft to determine stroke.

    Shocks bolt right on but results come about with shock tuning by fiddling with valving and spring rates. If you are unhappy with the way your car rides see if the shocks are adjustible.
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    Re: 800cc Buggy shocks
    #3
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    Hi Gene,

    * Would you know why the piggy back reservoir is so much more than the remote reservoir.
    and what my be the difference between Imulsion and reservoir. I found a place called
    offroad wharehouse that sells both Bilstien and Fox Shocks. It seems like there prices are fairly
    descent. $235 without coils for imulsion and $285 for Reservoir. add coils for $65 each.

    Thanks Joe
    06 800cc Roketa, Turbo'd + many mods
    09 RZR 170 yut many mods
    09 WR 250f
    09 KLX 140L Monster Energy
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    Re: 800cc Buggy shocks
    #4
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    I think it varies between manufacturers whether a piggy back or remote is cheaper. Works for example, the piggy backs are more than the remote, but have compression dampening adjustment. The piggy backs are cheaper than remote with compression adjustment. Remotes often use the same connection that a schraeder valve would normally go into, but piggy back would require a different top. Emulsion means nothing separates the oil from the nitrogen. Not all shocks without reservoirs are emulsion. Bilstein 6100s have a floating piston in the main shock body. Emulsion shocks can get erratic if you shake them up too much. They have to be mounted vertical. According to an engineer at Works, the time before a rebuild is about 4 times longer with reservoirs.

    I have had 12 Bilsteins on order for 4 or 5 months. You might have trouble getting them right now.

    For a one off machine (one off to you), you can't beat Works valving guarantee. They will re valve your shocks free within 30 days if they are not right. I have had very good luck with filling out the spec sheets and getting a shock that worked great first try. They have their limitations. They are a small body shock so you are limited in the total weight of the car. Their engineers would let you know if the weight you give them is an issue. You would want the thicker shafts. It is cheaper to start with a higher base shock than add options to the lower ones. The G-Series and Pro series have 5/8" shafts to begin with. Both have threaded pre-load and would include triple rate springs with bottoming collars to set the cross over. Both have rebound dampening adjustment. The G-series have an option for remote reservoirs and are emulsion otherwise. The Pro series are the piggy back with compression dampening adjustment. I think the longest travel shock they can make is 8". I have 8 pairs of shocks with custom valving on order right now. Most are G-Series and one pair is Pro-series.
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