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    Titanium MIG 170?
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    Question
    Has anyone used the Titanium MiG 170? would it be good for industrial use?

    Here is the the specs:
    MIG 170 Professional Welder with 120/240 Volt Input (harborfreight.com)

    It is sold by Harbor Freight but, it has very good reviews and is comparable to the Miller 211. Let me know what you think! I need an upgrade from my HD power systems SMIG120gg

    After that there would be one more welder. That is the Titanium Unlimited 200 Professional Multiprocess Welder With 120/240 Volt Input.
    It is a multiprocces welder that is capable of mig, tig, and stick. the only drawback is that it is about $300 more than the 170.

    here is the link for that welder:
    Unlimited 200™ Professional Multiprocess Welder with 120/240 Volt Input (harborfreight.com)

    which should I take?
    JM




    I

    Last edited by JMperformance; 01-16-2021 at 12:33 AM.
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    Re: Titanium MIG 170?
    #2
    The Wizard of Welding kustomfab2003's Avatar
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    Those welders perform fairly well just be sure a check/understand the limitations on 120v and 240v. Many of them have a far reduced output on 120V side of things. As I mentioned in your other posts look at the duty cycle ratings at the amperage you would expect to used the equipment. For tubing and buggy building that would be in the 95-130amp range for most things.

    When they compare them to the Millers, they are comparing spec's, not durability or reliability. Take duty cycle for example, the ratings may be the same on paper but what isn't shown is does the machine have fan on demand or constant (if constant, then it draws more out of the wall), how long until the equipment gets hot? Duty cycle comes into play once the machine get hot and is rated at a certain operating temperature.

    With duty cycle, find a machine that has at least a 20% at 120amps, this will allow you to weld out your chassis once complete. 20% equals 2 minutes of welding out of 10 minutes. I rarely find anyone except at the large accounts I call on that can weld for 2 minutes not stop, but it comes down to thermal cycling of the machine, once it gets hot it get cranky. Some machines will power down and you have to wait for it to cool, others will just run to failure. Take a honest look at your requirements and budget and purchase based upon the above criteria.

    How is the machine affected by voltage spikes or change in input power, moisture levels, dust, static electricity and the list goes on and on. I am not going to say Miller is perfect, because the equipment is only as reliable as the components supplied by outside suppliers and in this day in age it is a real challenge. What I can say is that the levels of reliability testing far exceeds that of what most of the equipment on the market today could even pass.

    That being said, we all have to start somewhere. Get a machine you can AFFORD and get SERVICED or REPLACEMENT parts for.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by kustomfab2003; 01-16-2021 at 02:39 PM.
    Marine Veteran Sgt USMC 8151/8541 1992-2000
    Process Improvement Specialist Miller Electric MFG LLC
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    Re: Titanium MIG 170?
    #3
    Keeper of the Asylum K-fab's Avatar
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    Listen to this man’s advice. He’s by far the most knowledgeable about welding on this forum. The only other person I know on his level is not on this forum.

    As painful as it can be, if you can pony up the money and purchase a higher quality welder right off the bat, the results will pay for themselves, the machine will last longer, be better, etc..

    Harbor Freight stuff usually supplies you with the level of the price relative to quality. Their pneumatic stuff would be the exception to the rule (lasts, works very well for the cost).

    That said, the 240 V system won’t be taxed nearly as much as the 120 so maybe, since you’ll be using it more on the lower/mid spectrum of it’s design, it will suffice. The thickest material you should see on your build should only be .125” so a machine that claims 1/4 capable should be able to do your work.

    Don't let the word “industrial” draw you in as a catch phrase/selling point. You have to ask “Just what is industrial?” You can take the biggest pile-‘o-crap welder, use it once in a factory and claim it “industrial”.

    One last thing, related to duty cycle. You’ll discover that your gonna end up with hundreds of little quick tacks and short weld runs. About the only time you’ll weld “for hours” is once the chassis and suspension components are complete, work and you’re ready to solidify the build.

    Tack EVERYTHING enough to make it hold, fully weld nothing until the chassis is done. Will save you a lot of cutting, grinding, swearing.
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    Dirt is for fast drivers



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    Re: Titanium MIG 170?
    #4
    The Wizard of Welding kustomfab2003's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K-fab View Post
    Listen to this man’s advice. He’s by far the most knowledgeable about welding on this forum. The only other person I know on his level is not on this forum.

    As painful as it can be, if you can pony up the money and purchase a higher quality welder right off the bat, the results will pay for themselves, the machine will last longer, be better, etc..

    Harbor Freight stuff usually supplies you with the level of the price relative to quality. Their pneumatic stuff would be the exception to the rule (lasts, works very well for the cost).

    That said, the 240 V system won’t be taxed nearly as much as the 120 so maybe, since you’ll be using it more on the lower/mid spectrum of it’s design, it will suffice. The thickest material you should see on your build should only be .125” so a machine that claims 1/4 capable should be able to do your work.

    Don't let the word “industrial” draw you in as a catch phrase/selling point. You have to ask “Just what is industrial?” You can take the biggest pile-‘o-crap welder, use it once in a factory and claim it “industrial”.

    One last thing, related to duty cycle. You’ll discover that your gonna end up with hundreds of little quick tacks and short weld runs. About the only time you’ll weld “for hours” is once the chassis and suspension components are complete, work and you’re ready to solidify the build.

    Tack EVERYTHING enough to make it hold, fully weld nothing until the chassis is done. Will save you a lot of cutting, grinding, swearing.
    K-Fab --- Thank you!!


    JMPerformance - I have edited and spaced some of my comments above to give you a better perspective on what to look for... I believe I read in one of your other posts that you are a student and just getting started, that being said, that is how I framed my responses. Now, if you are looking to get into a business for yourself, I would take caution in buying a lightweight machine. Will it get you by, yes... are you potentially setting yourself up for future failure, absolutely. My first welder was in the realm of what you are attempting to use, knowing it's limitations I stuck with non structural ornamental type items to sell util I could afford a welder that I could trust would produce sound welds and keep me off a lawyers radar!!!

    One other thing to make note of... It mentions that it draws 24 amps on 120V for a 90amp weld... check your breaker box and make sure you have a breaker as well as adequate wire sizing before committing to a welder, it is not worth a house fire!
    Last edited by kustomfab2003; 01-16-2021 at 06:20 PM.
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