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    The Next Rorty R82s build
    #1
    Senior Member dune's Avatar
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    Well, it's my turn to get going on one of these cool 2 place Rorty R82s mini's. I'm going to try and photograph as much of the build as I can. So keep checking back. I've learned alot from bikelomen's thread and now it's time for me to try. I'll start with a few comments of my experience with Rorty. He has been a tremendous help so far. When I ordered the plans from him he was very responsive and has done alot for me so I could get going on ordering materials prior to the plan cd arriving. I feel very comfortable building this car knowing Rorty is just an email away with all his experience.
    I am going to do one thing differently than the plans call out. The plan calls for the Bottom Frame to be made out of 1.5" sq tube. I will be using 1.5" round tube for the bottom. I've already mapped out the bends and it looks to be relatively easy to make the switch. The upper frame will be made out of 1.25 and 1" tube as the plan calls for. I just like the look of a full round tube chassis. No other reason for the change.

    My Fab Table built today: This was the first thing I've done for the project. The dimensions are: 9'-3"L x 5'W x 18"H (prior to castors) It's constructed out of 1.5"sq tube for all horz rails and 1" verts (webbing) with 1.5X2" sq tube corner legs. Side rails were built in a jig. This thing is rigid, level and true!!! It will be decked with 2 layers of 3/4" shop grade ply. This dimension will allow me to layout the entire lower frame on the top and install allignment blocks wherever needed. The table will also second for tube storage below in the webing.
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    looks like your off to a good start, just watch out for your shins when you fill the webbing up with tubing :wink:
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    #3
    Keeper of the Asylum K-fab's Avatar
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    That's one killer looking table. I like the idea of having a built in storage area underneath it.

    Instead of plywood, consider 1/8" steel sheeting. You'll discover it's easier to attach your grounding clamp on the table and weld away on the parts from there instead of having to move the ground clamp all the time.
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    #4
    Senior Member bikelomen's Avatar
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    That is one sturdy table. After this you can build a tank if you want :P

    Good job. Looks like your not going to cut any corners. I like the idea of a metal table too. Not having to clamp everywhere is a nice touch
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    #5
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    For the benefit of others on the forum, the base of the R82s is specced for 35mm SHS (primarily to make it easier for noobs to get the base of the chassis started without fishmouths), but I wouldn't replace it with 38.1mm (1.5") tube, I would stick with the same 31.8mm (1.25") tube that is used for the majority of the chassis.

    You’re off to a good start with that table – it’s about the sturdiest home built I’ve seen. 8)

    I would add to K-fab’s comments; 1/8” steel would make an excellent top, but if you have room to set it up semi-permanently, I would go even thicker. A steel table is so useful; you can weld temporary “third arms” and “sky hooks” to it which can be ground off afterwards.

    If going the steel top route, I would give the whole surface a really good spray with anti-spatter spray (or spray-on cooking oil – if you don’t mind the smell of BBQ) before you even pick up the welding torch. Steel tables are only good as long as they’re smooth!
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    #6
    Senior Member dune's Avatar
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    Thanks for the heads up Rorty. I'll keep the bottom frame at 1.25
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    #7
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    my .02 cents worth, i have found 1.50 to be cheaper than 1.25, if it was me to do again wich i will, i will make hole car 1.50 x .095, seems most racing circuts are 1.50 minimum...just my opinion... 8)

    even tho the protodie guys and myself are on bad terms now, i guess, there cars are 1.50, and the diameter looks far better than the smaller tube in apperance, it is more porportional to the size of the car i think...
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    I suppose it depends on whether you're a show pony or you're chasing every ounce for racing.

    1.5" tube is over rated for this chassis. If you start putting big heavy/powerful car engine and trans in a chassis, then it may warrant the use of 1.5" tube, but I've done the figures on my chassis and 1.25" x .095" is even more than necessary.

    For well over ten years, TORC stipulated 1.25" x .065" tube for the main elements of the chassis.

    When I became Chief Scrutineer, I was instrumental in re-writing the TORC Handbook and I pushed hard for the tube size to be increased to 1.25" with .080" wall thickness.

    The main reason for this was not what you might think. The .065" tube often proved difficult for non-professional welders to weld satisfactorily – people were either burning holes in the thin tube, or they turned the amps down and then just “stuck” the chassis together with chick poo. Both scenarios are undesirable from structural and safety viewpoints.

    Changing to .080” wall tube meant home builders could turn up the amps and make decent welds without blowing holes in it everywhere.

    There was a second, but lesser rationale for changing the wall thickness. Some of the early buggies that raced in TORC had big 500cc two-smoke singles fitted in them (YZ 490, CR 500 and KX500) and they could tear a chassis into pieces just idling in the pits! The frequency of the resonance from the big singles literally vibrated the thin tube until it would fracture.

    While such defects would render a buggy un race worthy, the problem could be easily spotted during scrutineering and it was then up to the individual drivers to sort out the fault.

    My own R5 race buggy is built out of 1.25" x .080" tube.
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    #9
    Senior Member bikelomen's Avatar
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    Dune,
    Just a question. From the pictures of your table it looks like you are using a gasless type mig welder. Is that true?
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    And so it begins...
    #10
    Admin Gene's Avatar
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    Dune,
    Looks good and best of all it will be available for subsequent cars. Keep it comin'!
    Gene
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