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    Re: A-arm design/setup
    #21
    Vendor yoshi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by De-Ranged View Post
    Do you mean me or him Yoshi....
    I was talking to the person I quoted......
    Last edited by yoshi; 08-27-2012 at 05:15 PM.
    www.SinisterSandSports.com
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    Re: A-arm design/setup
    #22
    Vendor yoshi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by De-Ranged View Post
    .....my experiance is in 4wd's, and I have noticed different motor sports bastardise terms to mean slightly different things
    My understanding
    "J" arm is a arm from an "A" arm suspension that has space issues so one or more arms are modified to fit around what can't be moved like shocks, steering, exhust etc, guessing the name came from the general shape


    Yes, terms get mixed up for different things.

    There is a little confusion on what a J-arm consist of.

    On the one hand, J-arm was originally used to describe an arm that had a single mount on the chassis with one long bolt running through it, (like the first pic). The arm looked like a "J" so it was referred to as a J-arm.

    More recently (not like in the last few years recently, but recent compared to when the single inboard mount was first introduced), people started running 2 inner mounts but still had the j shape to go around shocks (second pic), and since it looks like a "J", it is also referred to as a J-arm, which I understand the reasoning behind since it no longer forms an "A" to be called an A-arm, but don't 100 percent agree with it since there is not a straight line at the chassis mount to form the top of the J, which you can clearly see in the first pic.

    On my setup, my arm is in front of the shock for clearance, but I do not have a "J" shape, so I just consider my setup an offset A-arm since it is still an "A". (last 2 pictures)
    Last edited by yoshi; 08-27-2012 at 05:32 PM.
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    Re: A-arm design/setup
    #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by yoshi View Post
    I don't think you understand what a j-arm is, which can mount parallel to the chassis as well......
    Not helpful (see below).

    Quote Originally Posted by De-Ranged View Post
    Do you mean me or him Yoshi.... the reason I'm asking is my experiance is in 4wd's, and I have noticed different motor sports bastardise terms to mean slightly different things
    My understanding
    "J" arm is a arm from an "A" arm suspension that has space issues so one or more arms are modified to fit around what can't be moved like shocks, steering, exhust etc, guessing the name came from the general shape

    From what I understand from his description his chassis mounting points are raked (drawing has no reference marks to help)
    I'd guess the reference to the tyre moving in, is from a front elevation and due to the arc of the arms

    His arm length would be perpendicular to the line through both chassis mounts (same as any A arm)

    Cheers Reece
    View is looking down on arm. I thought this was the case but wasn't positive.

    Quote Originally Posted by yoshi View Post
    Yes, terms get mixed up for different things.

    There is a little confusion on what a J-arm consist of.

    On the one hand, J-arm was originally used to describe an arm that had a single mount on the chassis with one long bolt running through it, (like the first pic). The arm looked like a "J" so it was referred to as a J-arm.

    More recently (not like in the last few years recently, but recent compared to when the single inboard mount was first introduced), people started running 2 inner mounts but still had the j shape to go around shocks (second pic), and since it looks like a "J", it is also referred to as a J-arm, which I understand the reasoning behind since it no longer forms an "A" to be called an A-arm, but don't 100 percent agree with it since there is not a straight line at the chassis mount to form the top of the J, which you can clearly see in the first pic.

    On my setup, my arm is in front of the shock for clearance, but I do not have a "J" shape, so I just consider my setup an offset A-arm since it is still an "A". (last 2 pictures)
    Helpful.

    Thanks Reece and yoshi.
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    Re: A-arm design/setup
    #24
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    Cheers Yoshi never seen one of the early style arms
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    Re: A-arm design/setup
    #25
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    Now a question if you run hiems on inner and outer does the design of the arms and spindle etc still make that much differenc since it is infinitly adjustable????
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    Re: A-arm design/setup
    #26
    Millenium Member nutz4sand's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisMX-15 View Post
    Now a question if you run hiems on inner and outer does the design of the arms and spindle etc still make that much differenc since it is infinitly adjustable????
    Heims may allow for tiny irregularities but the threads on most are not super long and you want them threaded in deep enough so you have a lot of thread contact to your bungs. Don't forget jamnuts need some of that space on those heim threads.

    You may have some room to play but arms and spindles still need to be within the distance of safe thread depth. So maybe 1/2 inch to play with? Thats being kinda generous I think. Might get 3/4 on some?

    The better attention you pay to carefull arm length and spindle design means more room to actually adjust the suspension VS tweaking a heim to its limits just to try to get close.
    Now that NOBAMA has PROVEN he is the absolute WORST president in the history of history Jimmy Carter can thank him for stealing the dunce crown.

    Lets hope the next guy repeals NObama care along with the rest of the stupid crap this blight on our windshield has done.
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    Re: A-arm design/setup
    #27
    Senior Member deaner's Avatar
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    Another problem with adjusting rod ends much is that when you turn one of the inners out, the distance between the inners gets greater but the mounts are fixed. Hard to get back together. Can't go very much.
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