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    Polaris Chaincase/Drive Shaft Question
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    Senior Member darwinpayne2000's Avatar
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    Several posts in the forums state that Polaris uses a 1 inch keyed shaft for the snowmobile driven clutch. Are the sprockets in the chaincase also attached to the shaft using a key? I'm particularly interested in the lower sprocket and shaft. I want to use a different shaft than the shaft that drives the snowmobile belt and a 1 inch keyed shaft is pretty standard on other equipment.

    Also, forum posters have stated that Polaris moved away from the keyed shaft on their newer snowmobiles in favor of a splined shaft? What year/model did they make the change? Is it pretty safe to assume that any 90's era snowmobile has the keyed shaft(s)?
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    Re: Polaris Chaincase/Drive Shaft Question
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    Without knowing, I'd look at the online microfiche to find out. I spend a lot of time looking to tell what parts were used when, between what models, etc.
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    Re: Polaris Chaincase/Drive Shaft Question
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    Millenium Member nutz4sand's Avatar
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    Are you looking to use the sleds gearcase for reverse and need to tap power off the bottom shaft??

    If so these two companies make hex shaft shaped inner adaptors that you can slide on the shaft and make a sprocket land fit. Others have gotton these adaptors from them just for this purpose (IF that is what you need to do.) Just tossing it out as an option.

    http://www.baumhydraulics.com/home.p...0873832445d681

    G&G Manufacturing Company

    On other option I have considered for my sled trannies is finding two deep
    well sockets and cutting then machining (so its straight) the part off where the rachet plugs in. The sockets would need to fit/match the shaft nearly perfectly to do this.

    Once the sockets could slide on the shaft weld them to a flat circular palte thats got your sprocket mount holes drilled in it. Then true it up in the lathe. Collars on either side would be needed to hold it one you had it aligned.
    Last edited by nutz4sand; 01-14-2010 at 11:30 AM. Reason: wrong LINK!
    Now that NOBAMA has PROVEN he is the absolute WORST president in the history of history Jimmy Carter can thank him for stealing the dunce crown.

    Lets hope the next guy repeals NObama care along with the rest of the stupid crap this blight on our windshield has done.
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    Re: Polaris Chaincase/Drive Shaft Question
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    Super Moderator minibajaman's Avatar
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    The sprockets in the chaincase are splined to the shaft. Only the driven clutch uses a key. I don't know when they changed it, but yes I think most 90's sleds used keys. The hex shaft that drives the track is 1" across the flats. Therefore, you can turn it down to a 1" diameter shaft and cut a keyway in it if that is what you want to do. I cut a hex shape in a sprocket with hub because I think the hex is stronger than a key, but it depends how big the engine is.
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    Re: Polaris Chaincase/Drive Shaft Question
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    Senior Member darwinpayne2000's Avatar
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    Yes, I'm rebuilding a two-seater right now and revamping the entire rear-end. It will be used by a fair number of riders who are not die-hard off-roaders, so I'm looking for niceties, such as electric start, reverse and CVT transmission (no shifting).

    With Comet out of business, I've basically concluded that a late 90's era Polaris touring snowmobile offers virtually all of the features that I am looking for.

    The additional wrinkle in the puzzle is the Comet differential that I was planning to use on the drivetrain. A differential is nice for trail riding and makes it easier for the novice to steer sharp turns. Serious riders, however, want a lockout on the differential to power-up the sand dunes or maneuver through mud and snow. When I started this project, my plan was to modify the differential with a manual lockout and give me the best of both worlds.

    Due to the design and space considerations, it would be best to mount the lockout differential as a secondary jackshaft (bottom of the chaincase) on the rear. I would need to replace the existing lower shaft on the chaincase with the 1" keyed shaft of the differential. If the lower shaft that drives the track is not a 1" keyed shaft then I need to understand what it is and if it is possible to modify or replace the lower sprocket to work with the differential shaft.
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    Re: Polaris Chaincase/Drive Shaft Question
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    Senior Member darwinpayne2000's Avatar
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    Splined, huh. Well, something's gotta go!

    Personally, I could live without reverse but family members who drive my single-seater complain that they have to get out and push when they get in a tough spot. Me, I know better than to get myself in a spot where I have to reverse-out, but they aren't as experienced.

    I may stick with the differential option and find another solution for reverse. That, or the second rider gets to get out and be "reverse".
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    Re: Polaris Chaincase/Drive Shaft Question
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    Super Moderator minibajaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darwinpayne2000 View Post
    The additional wrinkle in the puzzle is the Comet differential that I was planning to use on the drivetrain. A differential is nice for trail riding and makes it easier for the novice to steer sharp turns. Serious riders, however, want a lockout on the differential to power-up the sand dunes or maneuver through mud and snow. When I started this project, my plan was to modify the differential with a manual lockout and give me the best of both worlds.

    Due to the design and space considerations, it would be best to mount the lockout differential as a secondary jackshaft (bottom of the chaincase) on the rear. I would need to replace the existing lower shaft on the chaincase with the 1" keyed shaft of the differential. If the lower shaft that drives the track is not a 1" keyed shaft then I need to understand what it is and if it is possible to modify or replace the lower sprocket to work with the differential shaft.
    Unless your buggy is very long and has poor suspension geometry, you shouldn't have too much trouble without a differential. I have no diff/locked rear, and have never had an issue with turning on any tight trails in the woods.

    Either way, you can't just mount the diff directly to the snowmobile chaincase. You need more gear reduction than the sled chaincase alone provides. See my build thread here https://www.minibuggy.net/forum/proje...um-lite-4.html for how I did this. If you basically copy what I did, you can just replace my rear solid shaft that the CV's connect to with your diff. What kind of axles are you using, and how will they connect to your diff with a 1" keyed shaft? Also, what size and type of engine are you using? Those Comet diffs are only rated for about 20 hp.
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    Re: Polaris Chaincase/Drive Shaft Question
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    Senior Member darwinpayne2000's Avatar
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    My thought was to mount the differential forward and use gear reduction between the differential and the rear cv axles. The lockout takes a little room, so there are advantages to having the differential on a secondary jackshaft.

    You also bring up an issue that I had overlooked. The original plan was to use a Briggs and Stratton Vanguard engine with about 28 horsepower. The Comet differential is rated at 20hp but several people I talked to said that it will handle up to 30hp without any issues. A snowmobile engine with 40-60hp would probably tear it up.

    I guess the differential will have to go.

    On a slightly related issue, I noticed in the pictures that you are using A-arms on the rear-end. Trailing arms seem to be the preferred method. Are the A-arms simpler to construct or do you just prefer them over trailing arms?
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    Re: Polaris Chaincase/Drive Shaft Question
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    Millenium Member nutz4sand's Avatar
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    The diff in this Buggy is one of the Comet diffs and the motor is a 100 plus horse 580cc twin cylinder rotax. I drove the buggy a couple times and it would flat haul the mail.

    The guy who built it also built one with a polaris triple sled motor and the comet diff and it held in it for a good while at least it did.

    They will take some snot. But being the company is no longer making them if you build around one and it fails you will need to change it to some thing you can find. Or scarf on a few still on shelves not to have for future parts.

    Plus the diffs different shafts need to be modded to fit CV flanges. Thats a bit of work in itself.

    A VW Diff can be substituted very easy and a lot cheaper and a lot tougher.

    Not to sure about adding a lockout to the VW diff. Some of the Audi Quattros had rear diffs that could be locked or unlocked from the factory (I have one sitting in the garage) But thats INSIDE the case. I dunno what it would take to use it outside. I plan to one day use it in a larger front engine buggy like a smaller version of the Sandrocket.
    Now that NOBAMA has PROVEN he is the absolute WORST president in the history of history Jimmy Carter can thank him for stealing the dunce crown.

    Lets hope the next guy repeals NObama care along with the rest of the stupid crap this blight on our windshield has done.
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    Re: Polaris Chaincase/Drive Shaft Question
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    Super Moderator minibajaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darwinpayne2000 View Post
    My thought was to mount the differential forward and use gear reduction between the differential and the rear cv axles. The lockout takes a little room, so there are advantages to having the differential on a secondary jackshaft.
    How exactly would you do that? I'm picturing two sets of chains and sprockets, one running from each side of the diff to each rear axle. I don't know if I have ever seen a diff that the axles did not directly connect to.

    Quote Originally Posted by darwinpayne2000 View Post
    You also bring up an issue that I had overlooked. The original plan was to use a Briggs and Stratton Vanguard engine with about 28 horsepower. The Comet differential is rated at 20hp but several people I talked to said that it will handle up to 30hp without any issues. A snowmobile engine with 40-60hp would probably tear it up.

    I guess the differential will have to go.
    I would imagine it could handle more power. I have taken one apart before and it looks fairly beefy. Comet generally rates their products really low for power. The first buggy I worked on when in college had the Comet diff in it, the second year we changed it to a solid axle and never looked back. Having a remote lockout would make the diff more appealing though.

    Quote Originally Posted by darwinpayne2000 View Post
    On a slightly related issue, I noticed in the pictures that you are using A-arms on the rear-end. Trailing arms seem to be the preferred method. Are the A-arms simpler to construct or do you just prefer them over trailing arms?
    I am actually using a 5 link rear suspension on my buggy. There are several discussions on here about the advantages and disadvantages of each. I like trailing arms too but wanted the 5 link for geometry control and adjustability sine I race, and also packaging as there is no way I could fit trailing arms on my buggy given its size.
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