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View Full Version : Brake Line sizes??



stetler
10-01-2008, 09:11 PM
Not sure if I'm posting this in the right section.
I am getting ready to run all brand new stainless hard brake lines in my car. I was wondering what size to run on the Brakes and what size to run for the clutch? I'm talking about the hard lines that run down the frame not the short run of steel braided lines to the calipers.

I'm running Wilwood Pedals
http://i232.photobucket.com/albums/ee279/bstetler_99/RhinoPedals002.jpg

Thanks!

plkracer
10-01-2008, 09:48 PM
I ran all 3/16 line. Pretty common stuff, and you don't need much flow anyways.

arrowhead
10-01-2008, 10:44 PM
I second that 3/16 is all that is used ......... anything larger makes it extremely hard to bleed all the air out of the system

LiveWire
10-02-2008, 12:03 PM
Larger also increases the internal surface area of the lines which results in more expansion.

stetler
10-02-2008, 01:49 PM
Thanks guys. Is it best just to buy some from PepBoys or should I get something else.
I figure it's just straight standard brake tubing. Is the coil of brake tubing hard to straighten out?

Gene
10-02-2008, 01:54 PM
Coiled tubing takes some massaging to make it straight as an arrow. I used it nearly everywhere on my car including down the A-arms. When used there it gets straight as the fittings are tightened but you have to cut the piece just right. I did end up with some scrap and I learned that I could do it successfully. Tubing runs that are out of sight aren't as pretty . . .

arrowhead
10-02-2008, 07:33 PM
I use 3/16 seamless aluminum tubing that is so easy to form and double flare and it's cheaper than steel for a 25' roll from McMaster-Carr It's also extremely light. Been using it for over twenty years without a failure for you skeptics

stetler
10-03-2008, 05:54 AM
I use 3/16 seamless aluminum tubing that is so easy to form and double flare and it's cheaper than steel for a 25' roll from McMaster-Carr It's also extremely light. Been using it for over twenty years without a failure for you skeptics
I will have to check into this. Is just the flaring tool the only tool I need or is it really worth it to buy the alignment pliers too?

masterfabr
10-03-2008, 05:55 AM
DO whatever you want but aluminum for brake lines is not the best idea. Copper plated steel brake line is the only proper line to use for brake lines.Also always do a double flare. There IS a right way and a WRONG way to do things.

LiveWire
10-03-2008, 01:28 PM
A failure would not be my concern. I would worry it would expand more giving a spongier pedal feel.

masterfabr
10-03-2008, 07:49 PM
I'm not going to argue.I'm just saying what is legally required for a vehicle on the street and for a good reason. Aluminum can and will work harden and fail eventually.May be fairly rare but WTH would anyone take the chance??????.:rolleyes:

masterfabr
10-03-2008, 07:57 PM
Coiled tubing takes some massaging to make it straight as an arrow. I used it nearly everywhere on my car including down the A-arms. When used there it gets straight as the fittings are tightened but you have to cut the piece just right. I did end up with some scrap and I learned that I could do it successfully. Tubing runs that are out of sight aren't as pretty . . .
It's no problem at all to make straight as an arrow. All you need do is roll it out and cut it with about 4 inches extra than needed. Clamp one end in a vise. Chuck up the other in a variable speed drill.Pull the brake line(works for wire also) taut and give it 3-4 revolutions. Don't spin more revolutions than needed as it will also harden the tube some. PRESTO! Perfectly straight tube. Short lengths are better done in longer lengths and then cut shorter.I usually do no less than 4' at a time.

stetler
10-07-2008, 08:48 PM
It's no problem at all to make straight as an arrow. All you need do is roll it out and cut it with about 4 inches extra than needed. Clamp one end in a vise. Chuck up the other in a variable speed drill.Pull the brake line(works for wire also) taut and give it 3-4 revolutions. Don't spin more revolutions than needed as it will also harden the tube some. PRESTO! Perfectly straight tube. Short lengths are better done in longer lengths and then cut shorter.I usually do no less than 4' at a time.

Very good info. Thank you for sharing. [smilie=non_banana1: I am going to go with the stainless steel tubing. Are the flared fittings that go on all a common size ? such as the MC connections ?

Also not a brake question but what size or throw slave cylinder do you guys use? Or should I stick to a morse cable?

LiveWire
10-08-2008, 07:38 AM
The AN connectors require a different flaring tool than the more common automotive inverted flare. I bought my flaring tool from McMaster Carr. Since the flare is large, I have to make sure there are no cracks or burrs on the end of the tube or it will split.